Tips Toolbox for Teaching Art

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Resource, What's New? | 0 comments

1. Remember—children express themselves through art. 2. Color in the whole paper! 3. Press hard on your crayons. 4. Everyone’s “marks” are good. 5. Scan art from reproductions onto transparencies. Use them for motivation. 6. Never turn down any donated art supplies. Once I thought, “what can I do with 1,000 ping pong balls?” Now that they have been used, I wish I had more! 7. Talk art talk! 8. Call the children artists. 9. ALWAYS make an example for the children from the supplies they are using. 10. Demonstrate a technique, hang it up to talk about it and then take it down so they won’t copy. 11. Create Gallery Walks. Hang art reproductions in the art room, hall or cafeteria. Students look at the art and fill in “Looking Log” forms about the name of the painting and the artist, the medium, the types of lines, colors, the feeling that the artwork gives, etc. 12. Always try a lesson first to see if it works. Use the materials and supplies that the children will be using. 13. Use bulletin boards and exhibits as teaching tools. 14. Learn names. 15. Special Needs Children are not throwaway children. They, too, are God’s beloved. 16. If you hear my voice, clap once…if you hear my voice, clap twice…and I don’t ever want to go beyond to claps. 17. If you have three steps in a lesson, always end by retelling the students the first step. 18. Teach cooperative learning. Children need to learn to work together. 19. When you get complaints about “he/she copied” say, “Take it as a compliment.” 20. When a child says, “I messed up,” answer, “Tell me where and let’s try to fix it. How would you do it differently?” 21. Writing has a place in the art room as well. Children enjoy writing about their work, whether it’s answering prepared questionnaires or responding to questions posed by the...

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Tips Toolbox for Teaching

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Resource, What's New? | 0 comments

1. Be consistent. 2. Laugh! 3. Children often tattle…he did this—she did that…and you are working at teaching a lesson and keeping 33 students in control. Time out for 20 individual he/she dids becomes a bit overwhelming. I have found that a simple “Thank you for telling me” usually works to keep all parties happy. 4. Children love to clean up. Use it as a reward. 5. Learn from your students. 6. Honestly evaluate your lessons. What could you do, say or demonstrate differently to make the lesson more productive, more exciting and more interactive? 7. Be sure to use good quality slides of artwork and preview them first to ensure that they are in the right order and not upside-down or backwards. 8. PRAISE! 9. Post “Art Room Rules” where all the children can read them. 10. When you mean, “Everyone look up here,” say,”Everyone look up here.” Not “Everyone up here.” Say what you mean. 11. Try not to say “Who can tell me?” You’ll get a better response with, “Tell me” or “Let’s see what you...

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Special Needs Teaching Tips

Posted by on Oct 19, 2011 in Resource, What's New? | 0 comments

12 Tips to teaching art to special needs children: 1. Create different levels of lessons since special needs kids have such a wide range of abilities. 2. Know what each student can do—who can cut with scissors, who needs help and who needs a special pair of scissors. 3. Use pre-cut shapes if needed. 4. Keep the projects under 15 minutes, since that’s their typical attention span. Plan more than one activity for each period. 5. Use different textured materials such as sandpaper, felt, fake fur, and cotton to keep the kids interested. It especially works with children who are severely and profoundly impaired since they respond to touch. 6. Do hand-over-hand with SPI kids. For autistic children, you can have them trace over a pattern. 7. With SPI kids especially, talk directly to them to respect their humanness. 8. For SPI kids, touch them, telling them that they look pretty. Treat them with the same respect and courtesy that you show your other students. 9. Respect an autistic child’s need to avoid touch and eye contact. It’s easier for you to adjust your behavior than for them to adjust their own. 10. Glitz and flash are also good. Go for mirrors or glitters or shiny papers. However, be careful—some children will try to eat anything. 11. Use non-toxic materials. Make sure the glue is edible. Butterscotch pudding makes a great finger paint. 12. Go for tactile projects: mold salt and flour dough, make hand prints and...

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